About

enough rockMy name is Kelley Marschall and I’m a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor. I have a Master’s in Counseling and Psychological Services from St. Mary’s University of Minnesota, and I work under the supervision of Dr. Vernon Devine. This means, with your written permission, I go over your case with Dr. Devine at regular intervals. (It’s kinda like a two-fer!)

My specialty is helping people get to know themselves in a way that helps them manage anxiety, uncertainty, avoidance, and the quest for perfection. I came to my interest in anxiety after spending time in the trenches in the anxiety-fueled film business, working as a freelance writer, and parenthood.  As an experienced mid-life parent, I coach people through mid-life, mid-life parenting, and/or mid-career reassessments and decisions. Things change, and so do we.

Don’t worry if your particular malady doesn’t fall into one of the above categories. Anxiety takes many forms and just about anything can trigger its onset. Which leads me to my method and philosophy. I’m a little unorthodox. No, I don’t advocate nudity, sweat lodges or chanting, but I do think the traditional therapy paradigm tends to be one-size-fits-all. Unlike some rigid, prescribed programs, my treatment fits the specific needs of each and every client.

I espouse a practical, research-based, person-centered, cognitive behavior and existentialist approach. Oh, and one other thing I try to incorporate – laughter. That’s right – as in ha ha funny. Don’t misunderstand, I take your therapy very seriously. And I want you to take it seriously, too. It’s ourselves that I don’t want us to take too seriously.

Which is precisely why my approach might work for you. Therapy is all too often a ponderous, heavy and intense endeavor – not something most people would look forward to.

You come to therapy with a recurring dream. In this dream, your boss is personified as a riding lawn mower that travels in a continuous circle as it whines incessantly. See, that’s funny.

Many therapists refer to sessions as ‘doing work’. Pick up your shovel and start unearthing. I spend time connecting with my clients, not just analyzing them. I believe in a process that  promotes positive well-being. Where clients feel relaxed and uninhibited. You might cry, but you will very definitely laugh.

Of course your problems are serious, otherwise you wouldn’t be seeking help. But there’s nothing like a little laughter to help give us perspective. Therapy can be hard work, but done right it can also have lightness and levity. It can be positive and life affirming. It can be, dare I say it, fun.

MA in Counseling and Psychological Services